FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


WHAT DO YOU MEAN YOU “WORK IN THE WATER” ?

We get this question A LOT. When we say we “work” in the water, we mean this both literally and metaphorically. Aspects of our experiences are conducted in water environments to expedite healing and reconnection to our elemental foundation in the body. Humans are made of mostly water, and this simple fact often overlooked, can help us better understand our nature and our make up.

IS THAT SAFE?

Great question. We require all participants to sign waivers of liability release prior to venturing out with us, however safety is our number one priority. For this reason, anytime we are conducting water meditation experiences, participants are on solo adventures. This gives our facilitator and explorer the highest level of focus and awareness of our surroundings, and potential challenges in the ever changing environment.

HOW MUCH TIME IS SPENT IN THE WATER ON ANY GIVEN WORKSHOP?

Usually no more then one hour is spent in the water. And all water experiences are conducted with a wetsuit, and a paddle board. So you are in the water, but really you are resting on a board, floating.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS TO WORKING AROUND OR IN WATER ENVIRONMENTS?

During immersion in water, our body sends out a signal to alter the balance of catecholamines in a manner that is similar to the balance that occurs during relaxation and meditation. In other words, just been in the water can create a feeling of relation and decrease our levels of stress.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN OUR MIND IS IN A MEDITATIVE STATE?

Meditation provides experiences that the mind can achieve no other way, such as inner silence and expanded awareness. And as the mind gains experience, the brain shows physical activity as well—sometimes profound changes. Just like Jay, I am fascinated by the way our mind expands when placed in the most expansive environment on the planet, {the ocean}. The specifics of the science around our brain, is complex… however, I think its important to note that… Measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy, and stress start to appear in subjects who practice mindfulness meditation for only eight weeks.

“What makes this finding so important is that it links how people feel when they meditate, with their physiology—the kind of proof that neuroscience demands. The old view was that meditators reported all kinds of mental and psychological benefits when in fact all they were doing in meditation was entering a state of deep relaxation. In the Harvard study, MRI scans were taken of the brains of 16 participants two weeks prior to the study and directly afterward. MRI images of the participants were also taken after the study was completed. It was already known that during meditation brain wave activity increases in areas like alpha waves. These MRIs showed something more permanent: denser gray matter in specific regions like the hippocampus, which is crucial for learning and memory, as well as in other areas associated with self-awareness, compassion, and reflection.”

- Deepak Chopra M.D.